Gluten Fee Burger Buns

Gluten Free Burger Buns
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 buns 10 mins
Cook Time Passive Time
40 mins 1 hour
Servings Prep Time
4 buns 10 mins
Cook Time Passive Time
40 mins 1 hour
Gluten Free Burger Buns
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 buns 10 mins
Cook Time Passive Time
40 mins 1 hour
Servings Prep Time
4 buns 10 mins
Cook Time Passive Time
40 mins 1 hour
Ingredients
Servings: buns
Instructions
  1. Pre heat your oven to 200 degrees Celcius.
  2. Mix together the water, yeast and maple syrup and leave somewhere warm to activate.
  3. Combine the flours, psyllium husk and salt in a bowl and make a well in the middle.
  4. Once the yeast has started bubbling pour that, the oil & vinegar into the well then using a wooden spoon mix until a ball of dough has formed.
  5. Split the mix into four pieces, roll into balls and place on a well oiled try or on baking parchment on a tray. The mix will be on the sticky side so you will need to wet your hands slightly between each roll.
  6. Leave the buns somewhere warm to prove for 1 hour.
  7. Brush the buns with the plant milk and sprinkle on seeds if using.
  8. Bake for 20mis then turn the tray & lower the temperature of the oven to 180 degrees Celcius and cook for a further 20mins.
  9. Put on a cooling rack and leave at least 30mins before cutting. They will seem quite heavy to pick up but the are deceptively soft and light on the inside.
Recipe Notes

I have found psyllium husk really helps keep gluten free breads and bakes moist for longer. It has similar gelling properties to chia & flaxseed but has the added bonus of retaining moisture & oils.

Some extra info.

Psyllium seed husks, also known as ispaghula, isabgol, or psyllium, are portions of the seeds of the plant Plantago ovata, a native of India and Pakistan. They are hygroscopic, which allows them to expand and become mucilaginous. Psyllium seed husk are indigestible and are a source of soluble dietary fiber. They are used to relieve constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, and diarrhea. They are also used as a regular dietary supplement to improve and maintain regular GI transit. The inert bulk of the husks helps provide a constant volume of solid material irrespective of other aspects of the diet or any disease condition of the gut. Some recent research has shown they may be effective in lowering cholesterol and controlling certain types of diabetes. Other uses include gluten-free baking, where ground psyllium seed husks bind moisture and help make breads less crumbly. The husks are used whole in their natural state, or dried and chopped or powdered for easier consumption. In either of these forms, one takes them by mixing them with water or another fluid. They are also available in capsules.

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